Living the Blue Zones way on Blue Monday

lake-4093784_1920

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ll know I’m a sucker for a new recipem book. And it’s true that probably the only things I regret letting go of in my decluttering phase are some of my lesser-used cookbooks.

Most recently, we’ve been enjoying the wonderful recipes from The Diabetes Weight Loss Cookbook by Katie Caldesi. These low carb, creative and incredibly tasty dishes offer a lighter take on tradional recipes with an italian twist. I’m also keen to have a look at Amelia Freer’s latest book, Simply Good for You but I am holding myself back because of the book I’m about to describe.

The most significant boost to our New Year’s culinary experimentation has to be the amazing The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner.

The Blue Zones concept is amazing; around 15 years ago, Buettner identified the 5 places around the world that have produced the world’s longest-living people. The concept is simple living at its best.

A dip into Blue Zones concept

Here are just 3 interesting aspects of the Blue Zones simple way of life:

Eat a whole food diet

The recipes in The Blue Zones Kitchen are mouth-wateringly good, but simple in their approach. Following the time-honoured recipes of older residents in each location, these dishes are based on just 20 or so basic ingredients and many feature all different types of beans, which – it is recommended – should be eaten every day.

Essentially promoting a plant-based diet, The Blue Zones Kitchen emphasizes whole foods including vegetables, nuts, olive oil (extra-virgin), some grains, lots of greens and fruits with red wine to drink with meals. Out go all kinds of processed foods, plus meat, fish, dairy, eggs and sugar are limited to special occasions or treats.

In our house, we’ve started with a huge pot of home-made Sardinian minestrone soup. That’s going to feel like a hug in a mug when it gets to lunch time today!

Exercise naturally

For exercise, ‘blue-zoners’ enjoy natural movement, especially walking and gardening, to keep them active and healthly throughout their whole lives. What’s refreshing is is that Blue Zones inhabitants simply walk wherever they have to go.

Consider walking up and down the mountains of Sardinia or Ikaria and you’ll realise that will get the heart pumping! That sounds so much more appealing than sitting at a desk all whole day long, then driving to the gym to attempt to offset the lack of activity earlier in the day.

At work, a small number of us who all live relatively near to one another are discussing the idea of setting up a walking group so that we can walk together to/from the office. By doing this, we’d reap the benefits of a simple daily workout whilst also building our social network. I can walk home from work in about 1 hour, 15 minutes, so as the daylight hours extend as we head towards spring, I’m looking forward to doing more of this.

Be sociable without social media

One of the positive aspects of those leading a ‘Blue Zones life’ is what Buettner describes as, “..active engagement with community, friends and family.” Spending quality time with other people increases people’s sense of wellbeing and I’ll be there’s not an iPhone in sight.

Last week, in the news, we learned that UK psychiatrists have said that tech companies must share their data with researchers to help improve understanding of the affects of social media on children. For all of us, having our heads stuck in our phones – even for reading – means that we’re failing to engage with others; make connections; or appreciate what’s going on around us.

This weekend, I intentionally spent less time on my phone and more time in the presence of others. It felt like I’d had several days away from the office, instead of just two. Maybe I should switch it off altogether at the weekends…. that would be an interesting experiment.

Don’t be blue

Today is said to be ‘Blue Monday’, a day that is said to be the most depressing in the year.

So, I say let’s not be blue. Let’s learn a little from the Blue Zones way of life and inject a little simplicity, health and happiness into our lives.


Join us!

Join hundreds of others in my online community, receiving unique news and content that’s only available for subscribers. On joining, you’ll get access to my free content on my Community Resources page.

Receive unique news and content by clicking on the button, below:

New button for MidsMins


Email me via catherineelizgordon@gmail.com, or connect with me on Instagram


 

Going barefoot in 2020

Happy New Year 2020! I hope that this new decade will bring you love, peace and joy. In fact, my word of the year is going to be ‘joy’. What’s yours?

Going barefoot

One of the things that will no doubt bring me joy in 2020 is doing more walking. This requires strength, stamina and flexibility both mentally and physically (and from head to toe). I’ve written before about my ambition to walk the South West Coast Path, which we started back in November. Now, I’ll be stepping up the pace, as we will tackle more of The Path in 2020.

For the longest time, I have mostly been wearing what my Grandma would probably have branded ‘sensible shoes’. As I possess long toes that are crushed inside pointy shoes, I decided some time ago that continuing to wear ill-fitting shoes (and/or shoes with heels) would not be good for my long-term wellbeing.

Plus, I use a standing desk at work, so towering over the keyboard when wearing heels negates the benefits of having the desk at all, as this has a negative effect on posture.

Ecco has been my go-to brand of choice in recent years, but last year I came across minimalist barefoot shoes.

A ‘barefoot shoe’ is an oxymoron

The concept of a barefoot shoe is an oxymoron. You’re not literally going without shoes, but the idea of a barefoot shoe is that you have room for the toes to splay naturally and the foot is able to work in the way God designed! My daughter, seeing the picture of my foot alongside the barefoot shoe was horrified: “Mum!!! You cannot put your FEET! On Instagram!!! Your feet!!!!” But I’ve done it again by posting a picture here. If you don’t like feet, feel free to look away….

I’ve tried the Primus Knit and the Ra Slip On

My first pair (pictured) were the Vivobarefoot Primus Knit in Olive. I have found them to be well-made and exactly as described. They are thin-soled, wide and shallow (note that, if you have a high instep, this shape might not suit you). I feel as though they give my feet a little massage when I wear them and, whilst you can feel the ground beneath your feet, this is not uncomfortable. However, these are not waterproof shoes. Given all the rain we’ve had, I’ve not been able to wear them outside on a wet day. This style is better off kept indoors and for the dry weather.

The Ra Slip On has solved my problem of what to wear in the office. The majority of the Barefoot shoes sold by Vivobarefoot are more ‘sporty spice’ than ‘posh spice.’ The Ra Slip On goes with anything and works just as well with a dress and tights as it does with jeans and a jumper. So far so good!

When the brand re-stocks its boots next autumn, I’m going to be first in line.

Joining the barefoot revolution

Tim Brennan, founder of Vivobarefoot, has now set up a community of barefoot enthusiasts. The idea is to bring barefoot shoes to the masses and revolutionalise health across the world. And why not!? Check out Tim on Instagram where you can see pictures of his inital proof-of-concept shoe and find out how to get involved.

So, what will bring you joy in 2020? Maybe going barefoot can be a part of it?


Join us!

Join hundreds of others in my online community, receiving unique news and content that’s only available for subscribers. On joining, you’ll get access to my free content on my Community Resources page.

Receive unique news and content by clicking on the button, below:

New button for MidsMins


Email me via catherineelizgordon@gmail.com, or connect with me on Instagram