Rambling along the English Coastal Path

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Craster, Northumberland

We’ve just returned from a week in the most northerly county of England: Northumberland (so called because it is situated on land north of the River Humber).

Having fallen in love with the South West when our daughter was small, my heart has always called me back to Cornwall. However, when Mr G suggested we explore another stretch of British coastline, I agreed to accept the challenge.

We rented our home for the week through Coquet Cottages, an award-winning luxury holiday cottage company. This turned out to be a brilliant choice; it was delightful, as you’ll have seen from some of my most recent Instagram posts and stories.

Heading North

The first difference to the breaks we’d previously enjoyed was that this was a Friday to Friday holiday. This meant that I finished work on the Thursday evening, ready for our drive ‘up North’ the following morning.

Our route was incredibly simple. Once we were on the M1, we headed straight up to Leeds from where we picked up the A1, stopping to enjoy the friendly atmosphere of the Black Bull pub near to Scotch Corner.

On we travelled, arriving at the cottage in late afternoon, before heading off to explore the beach at Warkworth, our nearest village. It was such a thrill to walk over the dunes and find ourselves on stretch of golden sand that extended as far as the eye could see.

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Beautiful beaches

A castle on every corner

From that first moment, we knew we’d found somewhere rather special. With what seems like a castle on every corner, Northumberland combines stunning, unspoilt coastline with countryside to rival anywhere we’d been before. We couldn’t wait to explore.

During the course of the week, we did a lot of walking, which was a complete delight (even in the light rain we endured when doing a circular walk from Hauxley Nature Reserve, via the water’s edge, and back again). This was life lived at a slower pace, simply and with time to notice and appreciate our surroundings.

Wonderful walks

These were the real highlights:

  • Dunstanburgh Castle from Craster (pick up some fresh Kippers for your tea on the way back in Craster)
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Dunstanburgh Castle
  • Seahouses to Bamburgh Castle (and back) (our longest walk at 11.4 km and just under 19,000 steps.
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Bamburgh Castle
  • A circular walk from the beautiful village of Rothbury, about half an hour from the coast and the home of Cragside, owned by the National Trust. Here, you have a real sense that you’re in Border country; the landscape is more dramatic and the stone properties suggest a hardy existence in winter. Plus, we were treated to our very own private air show, as a pair of fighter jets flew right over our heads, as we crossed the moor. 
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Rothbury

We also visited Alnwick (pronounced Ann-ick), home of the famous Alnwick Castle (but not dog friendly, so we couldn’t go inside). Alnwick is best known for two famous Harrys: Harry Hotspur (who features in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part One) and Harry Potter (the castle was one of the film locations for the Harry Potter series).

Nearby Alnmouth (Alun-muth), whose image features on the home page of Coquet Cottages’ website, was another gem. Ollie, our 5 year old cockapoo, was very happy playing catch-ball on the beach there.

Cosy evenings

During the evenings, once I managed to get the logburner going, we settled down to enjoy a glass of wine and a good book. I’ve been reading Raynor Winn’s wonderful memoir, The Salt Path, which charts the journey of Winn and her husband, Moth, as they walk the 630-mile South West Coastal Path. It’s a terrific read (and I’m not going to give the story away – you have to read it!), evoking memories of many of the places we’d visited over the years of holidaying in Devon and Cornwall. Theirs was no afternoon stroll, however; the Winns were wild-camping and completely exposed to the elements, but this book got me thinking about the therapeutic nature of walking.

Walking for health

As humans, we’re meant to walk. It’s kinder to our joints than running but has all the same health benefits (you just have to do it for longer). There’s also something meditative and calming about walking outdoors; the steady, rhythmic aspect of trekking – coupled with clean, fresh air – blows the cobwebs away and allows you to get a different perspective on life.

It seems we’re not alone in thinking that walking is a good idea; it appears we’re right ‘on trend.’ An article in The Guardian suggests that walking is now considered cool.

Walking for good

Not just ‘cool’, walking remains a force for good. Take Becky and Jamie Gunning who’ve just walked 198 miles (coast to coast) in 7 days to raise money for the Royal Marsden Cancer Charity – and jolly well managed to raise over £20k. You can check out Becky’s Instagram to find out more.

Closer to home, the young people from my daughter’s school recently took part in a gruelling 24 mile walk across the top of the Coventry Way (some did the whole hog at 40 miles), also raising money for a jolly good cause.

So, an idea is forming (with a little nudge from my friend, Rae). It is said that when men experience a mid-life crisis, they buy a fast car. Women go walking. Well, I may not be in crisis, but I have a zero birthday not too far ahead. Maybe I’ll give myself a little walking challenge of my own. I’d certainly like to return to lovely Northumbria; a few more ramblings along the English coastal path would be just lovely.


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Slow-down hacks for a simpler summer

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It’s been a whole month since my last post, so I’ve been desperate to get back to the blog. How are you all?

The reasons for my silence are twofold: Mr G has been jetting around Europe for work (Warsaw twice; Prague once), so life’s a bit different when he’s not around (all you single parents out there, you have my utmost respect).

Plus, I’ve been spending some extra time during the evenings, sitting alongside our 17-year-old in the car, to enable her to practise her driving skills. Having past her theory test, she now has her practical booked for next month, so we’re keeping everything crossed.

Happily, after what has also been a very intense period at work, I’m really looking forward to the summer. It’s a great time to slow down and simplify life a little bit, so here are some hacks for you that I’m going to be putting into practice once school’s out.

Switch your mode of transport

Even when you’re at work over the summer, if your journey permits it, try changing your mode of transport. My workplace is just 5 miles away, so I’ll be dusting off my bicycle and whizzing to the office via the cycle paths. I don’t want to cycle all year round (the route is not fully lit), but when the mornings and evenings are filled with sunlight, it’s lovely being able to arrive at the office feeling oxygen-filled and energised by a bike ride.

I met another Sixth Form parent on Thursday who told me that she’d recently taken part in the school’s 100 mile charity bike ride in France; she suggested I go along next time. I don’t know about that, but I might just manage 10 miles a day!

Eat simply

Did I tell you that I’m loving Madeleine Shaw’s cookbook, Ready Steady Glow (recommended to me by fellow blogger, Glamour in the County). Full of easy-to-make, tasty and nutritious recipes, Shaw’s way of cooking has me getting meals on the table – from start to finish – in less than half an hour. Even better, I’m going to be choosing her simple salads to throw together during the week this summer. That will leave the weekends for some more self-indulgent and time-consuming culinary creations.

Dine outside

Talking of food, we love eating out when the weather is fine. Last year’s heatwave saw us making very good use of our patio set. This year, so far, we’ve had a very wet June but I live in hope that the weather during the school holidays will be kind to us.

Today is going to be the hottest yet and I am – unusually – at home entirely alone. Mr G has taken our teen to a university open day and Ollie-bobs (cockapoo) is at the groomer’s.

Invite others

I’m hoping to follow in the footsteps of inveterate people-gatherer Sarah Harmeyer of www.neighborstable.com whose story I read about in the latest issue of Simplify Magazine.

Harmeyer’s welcoming ethos is an inspiration to us all; keeping it simple, but extending the hand of friendship to all-comers is something I’m going to try to do more of during the holidays.

Get those jobs done

This week saw the start of a series of household jobs we’ve been meaning to get done for some time. Somehow it seems easier to be doing work on the house when the weather is fine.

Plus, we’re doing some jobs that really should be done in the summer months. First up, we’re replacing our home’s 30 year old gutters and drainpipes and repairing a part of the roof. We’ll be glad we did this come the autumn.

Get your sea fix

This year, we’re visiting the Northumbrian coast for the first time. Fellow cockapoo owners have recommended some dog-friendly places to visit (and eat) and we’re staying in a cottage that’s managed by an award-winning lettings agency. It’s my dream to one day visit places such as New England. In the meantime, we’ll take the simpler route of jumping in the car in ‘old England’ and heading north. We should be there in around 4-5 hours and are looking forward to the slower pace of coastal living.

Dress simply

The loveliest thing about summer is being able to slip on a dress, dig your feet into sandals (or trainers if the weather’s a bit inclement – I’m loving the white trainers trend), grabbing a bag then heading out of the door. I don’t know about you, but I also think that summer is a time when you can afford to dress a little more casually; be comfortable; and be a little more sartorially relaxed.

What are your favourite summer hacks? Do let me know by replying in the comments below!


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Declaring email bankruptcy

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There’s something distinctly unfunny about writing a whole blog post on managing emails, only to make a monumental error and lose the whole post. That just happened to me!

So, this feels a bit like having to re-do a piece of homework, but I hope that – on reading this post – you’ll feel it was worthwhile topic of conversation.

Simplifying your inbox

So much of our working lives revolve around composing, reviewing, reading, forwarding, saving, filing, retrieving – or even recalling – those little electronic postcards we call email.

Like me, if you have already been successful in simplifying other aspects of your life, applying some organisational principles to electronic mail is another step towards minimalism.

Emails falling like raindrops

On Bank Holiday Monday (Memorial Day to my lovely US readers), I spent some time that morning sitting at my breakfast bar, catching up on work emails.

Whilst it could be argued that I shouldn’t be doing this, the reality was that I’d had a very full diary during the preceding week, so there were quite a few emails that needed even just a little attention. This quiet couple of hours, with a lovely cup of coffee at my side, meant that I could regain a sense of overall control and feel positive about resuming work the following day knowing that I was on top of things.

Is email ‘real’ work?

If you listen to Laura Vanderkam’s Before Breakfast podcast, you may have heard the episode in which Laura suggests allotting specific time slots during the day for handling email correspondence.

This is a good idea, as you can then close your mailbox when undertaking other focused activities and avoid the lure of dealing with a quick message as soon as it arrives. In my case, I have switched off notifications and I try to make sure I’ve retrieved anything I need from my mailbox, before embarking on a non-email task.

Interruptions are sometimes welcome, but the reality is that they are such a distraction that we can take some time to recover and re-focus on the task in hand.

That said, email isn’t just ‘noise’. In my organisation, it is “real work” so we can’t ignore it.

Managing the inbox

I’ve written about this before, but when I’m having a proper sprint through my inbox, I’ll intentionally sort received items by Subject. This way, if there’s been a conversation on a particular topic, I can delete all but the very latest message and see the whole trail in one email.

I’m now also much more inclined to press ‘delete’ on as many messages as possible and don’t need to file anything that’s just a casual ‘thank you’ or acknowledgement.

Surely, there are other ways to communicate?

I work in Higher Education, so some of my colleagues with teaching-focussed roles find that handling email becomes even more of a challenge for them, as they aren’t seated at a desk all of the time. Recently, we’ve been discussing how we can improve internal communications to this group of staff, so that they perhaps receive a digest of items on a regular basis, rather than a drip-drip-drip of regular emails.

For my own part, wherever possible, I pick up the phone to speak to someone, rather than sending yet another message.

What do you do in your workplace?

What about personal emails?

I use gmail for personal mail, but I want to avoid it becoming ‘grrr-mail’. I want to read ‘good-mail’!

So, I have deliberately and very intentionally unsubscribed from practically all the marketing emails that I used to receive. This way, the only mail that comes through my virtual letterbox is genuinely useful, informative or necessary.

Listening to one of my favourite podcasts recently, I was struck by a suggestion that a great happiness hack would be to ‘declare bankruptcy’ on a mailbox that had simply got out of hand. Surely, this is the ultimate digital declutter?!  I find the financial analogy amusing but could we (dare we) go that far?

Have you ever done that? However tempting that may be, I don’t think I’d delete an account (or walk away from it), unless I’d really wound it down properly.

P.S.

Of course, the irony of this is not lost on me; I know this post is likely to be coming to you via your own inbox (and I’m glad you’re there!). So drop me a line via email (ha ha!) or reply to this post by clicking on ‘reply’ below. I’d love to hear from you.


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Why it’s important to let our teens fail

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In our family, we have a running joke about timekeeping, which came about because our daughter has always operated in a way that is more lastminute.com than ‘early bird catches the worm.’

The joke is that our teen should never join the emergency services because the siren would sound and she’d be calling, “I’ll be there in a minute!”

Being under-prepared

There is, though, a serious point here. Being unprepared or disorganised not only puts the individual concerned under pressure; it can also place a burden on others.

If your child is late for school and you’re driving her, you’re going to risk being late yourself. At the other end of the day, her having forgotten to take her key means you have to leave work early to go home to let her in.

There are other examples. I wonder if they are familiar to you?

  • Not having the necessary PE kit ready (which puts pressure on others to lend theirs)
  • Discovering the list of ingredients required for a cookery class only on the way to the supermarket to purchase them the night before they are required (meaning we duplicate what we already have in the cupboard because we don’t have time to go home first and measure out the quantities)
  • Having to pay a next-day-delivery charge for a new item of clothing (adds unnecessary cost to a purchase that could have been done many days before)
  • Forgetting to send a calendar invitation for an appointment, then finding that the parent you were relying on to take you now has other plans

In spite of reminders that are intended to be helpful, we still seem to sort things out at the 11th hour. Why?

Safe fails

Yesterday, I was with a very dear friend whose twin boys I am privileged to call my Godsons. As the mum of an older daughter who also has a teenager in the same year as my own, my wise pal pointed out an obvious truth that hadn’t previously occurred to me. That is, every time you sweep in and solve a problem for your offspring, you’re preventing them from having a learning experience.

We need to let our kids fail in a safe environment, so that they are better equipped to cope when we aren’t around to pick up the pieces.

Helicopter parenting

As a working mum, I’ve never hovered over my child, anticipating her every need. However, in wanting to be supportive, it could be argued that I’ve been a little bit too eager to step in to facilitate or solve a problem. In so doing, I’m potentially preventing my teenager from learning a valuable lesson.

Living with the consequences

So, what’s the worst thing that can happen if she doesn’t have her PE kit? In the lower school, she’d have got a detention. In Sixth Form, she might be resourceful, but she’d still have the inconvenience of sorting out the problem herself.

What if she doesn’t have her cooking ingredients? She’ll have to explain herself. This is potentially embarrassing but might make her think twice about not being adequately prepared.

Independence is not neglect

When our daughter was little, we adopted a little saying, “Independence is not neglect.” But I seem to have forgotten this now that she is older. I wonder why?

In spite of this, I am occasionally (pleasantly) surprised. Today, she tells me that she not only completed the short piece of research for her French homework, as required. She printed it 7 times (one for each member of the class and a copy for the teacher). She also provided an English translation on the reverse of each sheet and hole-punched each one so it would slot into everyone’s folder. This was totally unprompted and no-one else in the class had done it. If you can figure that out, you are a better person than I.

Maybe the highly-organised gene hasn’t completely skipped a generation. I’ll live in hope.

Plus, maybe I’ll let the odd thing slip from now on. After all, if we don’t make mistakes, we don’t make anything. And that’s a valuable lesson for us all.


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An Easter staycation

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This Easter, I’ve taken a whole week off work and it has been a real joy. It’s been several months since we have been ‘away, away’ but I enjoy pottering around at home and taking things slowly.

I would call this ‘staycation’ a ‘slow-cation’. It’s not that I haven’t done anything, mind you.

Gin & Book Club

On the evening of my last Friday of work, I got straight into holiday mode. This particular occasion saw the second gathering of a recently-formed ‘Gin & Book Club.’

This ingenious ‘books plus booze’ combination is the idea of my friend, Zoe. Following her 50th birthday last autumn, Zoe (with our help) has been sampling her collection of specialist gins that she received as gifts.

Sharing in this way has enabled us to sample all kinds of flavours that we might not otherwise have tried including marmalade, lemon drizzle and grapefruit. To this, we add our favourite tonic water, plus herbs, to make a lovely, refreshing drink.

Another positive is that we have not only renewed old friendships and nurtured new ones; we have also begun to enjoy literature that we might not otherwise have found. Our latest book was Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata. It’s odd, a little dark and – at times – very funny.

Zoe has also negotiated a discount if we want to buy the books we’ve chosen at our local bookshop. I turned up there to buy book number 3 (Tangerine by Christine Mangan) and it was gratifying to see how busy it was in there.

Shopping local?

Buying locally brings me onto a theme that I’ve been thinking about a lot. In spite of a healthy population of over 20,000 residents, Kenilworth has seen the closure of a number of independent stores in recent months. It also lacks some of the high street names that would be a draw to youngsters who want to shop; they have to go further afield.

It’s hard to reconcile the desire to support local retailers whilst being very intentional about what I buy. If I do need something, I will pop into town (garden rake, £7.50, Wilco’s), but it’s true that – as a family – we spend very little locally.

Going further afield

Friday was a mum and daughter day in Oxford. We took the train from Kenilworth (my first time since the station re-opened) via Leamington. Door-to-door, the whole journey was around an hour. I wish I could tell you that our objective in the ‘city of dreaming spires’ was to explore the historical architecture or take a trip on the river. Alas, it was to replenish Amy’s depleted wardrobe, as she finds the choices locally to be very limited (see above!).

In shopping with Amy, I have discovered the joys of reading on a smartphone whilst waiting for the ‘trying on’ to happen. I know I spent at least an hour in TopShop, during which time I read several chapters of Jenni Murray’s Memoirs of a not so dutiful Daughter. 

Oxford, it would seem, recognises the benefits of providing seating for those doing the waiting; it gives them more staying-power in support of those doing the shopping!

Being anti-social with digital media

This week, I have also remained largely immune to the lure of social media. Twitter seems to have got very shouty and political; Instagram more fun and supportive but still a potential digital rabbit-hole. So, whenever I have felt the twitch to check my phone, I’ve simply got back into my book, which has been far more rewarding.

Although I’m still dipping into Facebook from time to time, I’ve seen a number of people come off social media recently (some for good). What’s your take on it?

Getting my steps in

Alongside a couple of evening activities this week, Mr G and I have also started to do a bit more walking. We plan to invest in some new walking boots this spring, which is necessary for me; I had to consign my old ones to the recycling centre, as they were letting in water.

Since major back surgery last month, my husband is now on the BLT Plan: No Bending, No Lifting, No Twisting. That means that he is limited – especially during this period of recovery – in what he can do for exercise. His surgeon advises walking – and lots of it. So, we have started to venture a little further afield.

Yesterday, we started at The Red Lion at Hunningham, taking in a circular walk through the countryside via Weston-under-Wetherley and Cubbington before heading back to the start for a well-earned drink in the pub garden in the sunshine beneath the large umbrellas.

Today’s walk was just an hour’s circuit of the Millennium Walk round the Castle, so we have earned a little bit of Easter egg today.

One of the members of the ‘Gin & Book Club’ plans to walk the Cotswold Way next month, doing 10 miles per day over 10 days along with her family. I think I’ll need to walk a lot further and for longer before I attempt that, but I’m tempted…

So, what have you enjoyed this Easter? If you’re local, I’d love to know. If you’re further afield, what do the Easter holidays look like for you? Happy Easter, whatever you’re doing.


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Overbuyer or underbuyer? Either way, you might be cluttered

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I’ve just finished reading Gretchen Rubin’s latest book: Outer Order, Inner Calm.

As I mentioned in my April Community Newsletter, there aren’t many books I’ve not read on decluttering (see my Resources page if you’ve signed up to join the community for a list of some of them). Rubin’s twist on the topic is that she links the idea of clutter, wellbeing and happiness. That builds on the enduring theme of happiness about which she has written plenty.

Hands up, all you ‘under-buyers’? You may hold onto stuff because you seldom purchase something new. Perhaps you’re an ‘over-buyer’? If so, then you’re likely to stockpile things you don’t need.

I thought it would be interesting to explore this idea a bit further.

Overbuyer?

Courtney Carver is a self-confessed classic overbuyer; she would shop for fun, to fill an emotional void or as a way of treating herself. Did Carver need even more clothes? Of course not. But, as she wrote in her book, Soulful Simplicity, her un-intentional spending habits resulted in piles of debt, piles of clothes (still with labels on) never worn, and piles of stress.

Stockpiling

Of course, not all overbuying is about clothes. As Rubin writes, you’re likely to be an overbuyer if you stockpile stuff like toiletries; if you buy gifts for others without an intended recipient; or if you end up throwing away food or medicines because they’ve passed their use-by date.

Food waste

Food waste – an unintended consequence of overbuying – is a massive global problem. According to Friends of the Earth, the average UK family spends £470 annually on food that is binned. Even more shocking is that one third of all food produced around the globe is lost or wasted.

Inadequate storage

In terms of clutter, according to Rubin, overbuyers feel stressed because they end up being surrounded by things for which they have inadequate storage and feel hemmed in by all the stuff they’re holding onto.

Whilst I would probably class myself as a natural ‘spender’ as opposed to being a ‘saver’, I would not put myself in this category.

Underbuyer

Underbuyers may buy too little, so they’re unlikely to be prepared for bad weather or end up shopping for summer holiday clothes when the autumn/winter season stock has already hit the shelves.

Oh, that’s me!

Resisting replacements

Whilst I don’t resist buying the essentials, I do resist replacing worn out items such as household linens. Since we’ve been on a journey to improve our finances since January 2018, this has been largely cost driven, but I recognise the feeling of being stressed because I don’t have something suitable to wear for a special event.

Last minute shopping panics

There have also been times when I’ve had to rush out to get something for a holiday because I didn’t have the basics. This trait has clearly been recognised by others; my mother included a pack of tea-towels in my holiday gifts at Christmas!

Underbuying and clutter

If you’re an underbuyer, Rubin suggests that your distaste for shopping could actually contribute to clutter. This sounds counter-intuitive but it might be possible that you dread the idea of needing an item (thus being forced to go out and buy it) that you hold onto things, no matter how useless. That has certainly contributed to my clutter in the past.

Get Uncluttered

So, do you fall into either of these categories? And, if so, have they caused you to become more cluttered than you would like to be? If so, do take a look at my previous posts on how to tackle clutter. For some accountability and regular input, check out Joshua Becker’s Uncluttered Course, which is now open to new enrolments. Readers of my blog can now get 25% off the $89 dollar registration fee, so drop me a line via email if you’d like to benefit from this.


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Simplifying weekday meals

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I’ve written before about simplifying meal planning but – in the past week – we’ve had to ramp things up when it comes to making things simpler.

Mr G is recovering from major surgery on his back. As a result, he has been told not even to lift a full kettle, so I have been Chief Nurse, as well as being Head Cook and Bottle Washer.

Planning ahead

While Mr G was in hospital, I awoke very early one morning. Mulling things over, I decided to do some research on meal kits. Given that I’m still working full time during his recuperation, some of the things that he would normally do will now fall to me. And since I can’t be walking the dog and cooking the dinner at the same time, my logic was that getting a bit of help in the way of easy-to-prepare meals might be something to consider.

I don’t want to eat ready meals so….

Organic veggie boxes have been around for many years, but recipe boxes are a more recent phenomenon. I’d been aware of some of the ones that advertise extensively (e.g. Hello Fresh) but if you Google ‘recipe boxes’ up comes a whole raft of options. How on earth do you choose?

The Independent View

While undertaking my nocturnal scrolling, I came across this article from The Independent. Albeit around 18 months old, the article reviewed 12 of the best recipe boxes that were available at the time. I clicked on the links to find out more about the top 3 rated services: Gousto, Riverford and Yorkshire based Snap (northern slang for ‘food’).

Happily, the first two were still going strong but I wasn’t sure about Snap; perhaps it is no longer trading?

The product ranges

Here’s where you’d think it would be straightforward, but there are quite a few choices.

First up, the key question. Are you feeding four or two? Hmm. Well, neither. We are a family of three. Given that I like to take leftovers for lunch the following day, I decided to opt for the ‘family of four’ option.

Then, do you want dairy-free, gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian, low carb, 10 minute meals, everyday favourites, global kitchen, plant based.. the list goes on! It certainly seems there’s something for everyone, albeit I would concede, this is not the cheapest way to shop.

My choice

I decided to try Gousto, which was offering 50% off the first order. That means we paid £23.88 for 4 x meals for four this week.

If you’re interested in doing the same, click on any of the Gousto links I’ve posted here and you’ll get the same deal (50% off your first order in any one month, then 30% off orders in the same month). Full disclaimer: If you do this, I’d also get £15 credit towards my next box (and you’d then be able to pass on the same offer to friends in your own network).

The Independent described this company as offering ‘tasty and innovative’ meals and I have to say the pictures looked appealing. My key question was this: would the meal kit emulate something I had cooked from scratch, or would there be a ‘ready meal’ quality to it?

In reflecting on my motivation, I wanted something that would:

  • Be quick to prepare (the recipes provide exactly the quantities required, so no time spent weighing ingredients)
  • Provide some variety, with different flavours, tastes and textures
  • Take the planning and thinking time down considerably: I just selected what looked appealing, added the recipe to my box and that was it

Delivery

The delivery options were straightforward; I could pay extra for a timed delivery (albeit within quite a long window or accept the box would arrive any time during the day but with no delivery charge. I decided to go for the ‘free’ delivery, since Mr G would be at home to receive it.

Whoops! On the day of delivery, I received the following via email….

“Unfortunately, due to a small operational issue we’ve had to move your delivery to the evening delivery slot.

Your box will still arrive tomorrow, just a little later than planned – between 6pm and 10pm.”

Then, surprise! The box arrived late afternoon (thank goodness, we might have been hungry)…

Packaging

I was curious to see to what extent the packaging would be recyclable. Even when cooking from scratch (my usual mode of operation), we still – as a household – create a lot of recycling waste.

The Gousto box did contain some cellophane and plastic-wrapped items (you can’t transport a mozzarella in a paper bag), but I didn’t feel the packaging was excessive. Indeed, the company’s information booklet states a solid commitment to reducing waste this year.

What was curious was the sheep’s wool insulation that encircled the food and worked, along with two ice blocks, to keep the food cool. If we bought enough boxes, we could insulate our loft!

Sheeps wool

The Proof of the Pudding

So, onto the main event.

Breakfast bar

Were the recipes easy to follow? Yes! Although they’re designed for two people, so you have to make sure you’ve doubled each ingredient to create the meal for four. That said, the liquid quantities caught me out – I automatically doubled the amount of water needed for my ‘Avo Taco’ smokey beans, then realised that I only needed 50% more liquid.

The ‘Avo Tacos’ were really tasty and passed the ‘home cooked’ taste test. Indeed, because you’re working with fresh ingredients and perfectly-measured herbs and spices, you’re still cooking from scratch.

But, the main question has to be, “What did it taste like?”

We really enjoyed this first meal. I halved the total amount of spices, as we don’t like things to be too hot. This meant that we enjoyed all the flavour without the heat.

IMG-7743

Tonight’s meal is a Cheesy Tomato Gnocchi Tray Bake, which I’ve started preparing. When I get home, all I’ll do is a bit of mixing and final assembly, bung the dish in the oven and prepare some greens as a side dish.

10 out of 10?

So, how would I rate Gousto?

Actually, I quite liked it. It was fun receiving the box and digging out the carefully curated ingredients. The recipes offered taste options that meant I could choose a variety of meal types over the four days and they included both cooked meals and options for salad-based recipes. I’d certainly give it 9/10 so far. What I have changed for next time is the quantities, having decided that recipes for 2 will feed 3 nicely.

As you can see from the link to the Tray Bake recipe, everything’s really clear; you even get a nutritional breakdown, which would be especially useful if you’re counting calories.

So, bring on tonight’s dinner… and let’s see what’s in store for next week!


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