Staying at home

Most of the personal emails I’ve been getting during the current Covid-19 lockdown have fallen into 3 categories:

  1. Helping our customers….(insert company X’s statement of reassurance, safety and ‘necessary measures’)
  2. Coronavirus: (insert latest news here)
  3. The marketing campaigns capitalising on the ‘at home’ situation: “Wondering how to make the most of your space?” (from a very well-known UK high street department store)

I wanted to make my message a little simpler:

Hello…
How are you?
How are you getting on in your corner of the world?
And perhaps you will permit me to share a little of my experience so far?

Kenilworth and Covid-19

Our little Warwickshire town has strengthened further its community spirit by setting up a Facebook group to offer support and information (which store has loo rolls??!) and bring volunteers together. So far, at the time of writing, there are 600+ volunteers who have offered to be ‘street champions’ (guardian angels for their own neighbourhoods), shoppers, or helpers who can fetch, carry, deliver and support others.

One amazing lady asked local pubs and restaurants to let her have leftover ingredients at the point when they had to close their doors to the public. She created multiple dishes, then had them delivered to the elderly. I think we will see similar quiet but stoical acts of kindness, as the weeks progress.

Of course, the town came out onto doorsteps and balconies earlier this week, as the nation joined in a ‘Clap for Carers’.

Remote working

I’ve now been a ‘remote worker’ for a week and a day. Of course, this makes for an interesting experience when, suddenly, your only contact with colleagues is via MS Teams. Using Teams has opened up a whole new communciation channel to manage alongside emails (of which I counted one every 2 minutes yesterday). This arrangement also means that you’re sitting on your bottom 08:30 onwards. That said, remaining on the couch is what we have to do to save lives. If we can’t do that very simple thing, then we genuinely need our heads looking at.

I think we now realise how serious a situation we face , when many of us now know someone who is suspected of having the virus or has heard of someone else with symptoms. And neither royal blood nor high status in society makes you immune.

The downs and ups

My lovely sister is a physiotherapist by profession. Her normal job is to support the rehabilitation of those with neurological issues. It was sobering to learn yesterday that she was heading to the hospital to get patients home (as quickly as possible) and that she was also embarking upon respiratory training.

I had to say, I had a little cry when she told me what she was doing.

On the upside, there have been some very funny moments. I contributed to these by wearing a sombrero in many of my virtual meetings this week. Our choir also attempted a ‘rehearsal’ via Zoom, but we had to mute everyone, as it sounded really terrible. We kept our Director ‘un-muted’ and sang along to ourselves, before ‘un-muting’ everyone for a bit of a laugh at the end. It was fun and entertaining (for all the wrong reasons).

We are also recording a video of the choir singing Jason Mraz’s Unlonely. Today, I had a go at listenining to the backing track whilst recording me singing the soprano part. I can only hope that the final combined performance is better than my own feeble efforts!

Worry only about what you can control

Listening to a podcast today, I was reminded that there’s a danger in these unsettled times to ruminate over what could or what might happen, or fear the very worst. Being afraid might lead to us becoming unusually sharp with others, or feeling particularly stressed.

As Brené Brown has said this week, “This pandemic is a massive experiment in collective vulnerability. We can be our worst selves when we’re afraid, or our very best, bravest selves”.

I hope and pray that we use our time at home as positively as we can to help us stay brave and be resilient. It’s springtime here in the UK, so our gardens are starting to wake up following the wettest February on record. We have plenty to eat, somewhere safe and comfortable to be and every way to entertain ourselves indoors or in the garden.

So, do let me know how you are. I hope you’re doing OK. Be brave. Be your best self. Keep washing those hands. Stay at home to remain safe and keep others safe. And if ever there was a time be intentional, that time is now.


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Project 333: ‘How a little wardrobe challenge changed a whole life’

Imagine my surprise and delight when I had the chance to read a newly-arrived copy of Courtney Carver’s new book, Project 333. In case you’ve not yet seen it (the book’s official publication date was 3/3 (of course!), I thought you might appreciate a review. So, here it is!

If you’re familiar with Courtney Carver, then this is the book that followers of bemorewithless.com might have expected her to have written first. In fact, Soulful Simplicity came before which included a section on the project. Still, Project 333 (along with Carver’s popular Tiny Wardrobe Tour) is arguably the most well-known aspect of her work to date. With its humble beginnings back in 2010, Carver set herself a challenge that was to be the catalyst to other – more far-reaching – changes in her life.

Project 333 – the basics

The idea of this minimalist fashion challenge is that you set aside the rest of your wardrobe for a 3-month period during which you dress with the remaining 33 items or less (hence the name). When the 3 months are up, you’ll swap out some of those items and bring back others.

Most items you’ll wear will count towards the 33, including jewellery, shoes, accessories and bags. But workout gear, underwear and pyjamas (for example) don’t count.

Not another ‘how to’ book

Although Carver does talk about the idea of a ‘capsule wardrobe’, Project 333 isn’t merely another ‘how to’ book. Indeed, the approach is not at all prescriptive. Whilst there are lots of useful tips and some interesting case studies, the idea is that, by following the challenge, we remember to connect with ourselves; listen to our hearts; and ask the person who knows us best (ourselves).

Carver also demonstrates how the ‘three thirty-three’ concept can used as a way in to dealing with more signifcant and profound life questions. Nicely crafted into a series of themed chapters, the book describes, ‘…..how a little wardrobe challenge changed a whole life.’ That’s quite an audacious claim but if you know Carver’s work, you’ll know what an impact #project333 has made on her, those around her and the 1000s of people who’ve followed in her footsteps.

Life lessons, big or small

Project 333 works on a number of levels, so take from it from whatever you need. Want to sort out a messy wardrobe? Here are some tips you can use. Or maybe you need to tackle just a small part of your life first, which can then act as the catalyst for more far-reaching changes. You can get this here, too.

What Carver is clear about is this: taking part in the project won’t protect you from whatever the world throws at you, but its benefits have a lovely way of spilling over into ‘real life’.

Clothes are boring

This morning, I listened to Dame Kristen Scott Thomas on Susannah Constantine’s new podcast, My Wardrobe Malfunction. If you listen to this – or any of these conversations – they are far less about the clothes and much more about lives lived well. The outfits, garments and fashion moments, if they feature at all, are far from centre stage.  They are merely the conduit to a more interesting conversation.

I do like clothes (and I’m not averse to a real bargain), but I have stopped yearning for them. This has given me such freedom, saving hours of time and hard-earned money, as I have given up the quest to find the simplest of things: something to wear. This is Carver’s point. A shopping ‘fast’ (a bit like intermittent fasting) does you a world of good. It clears the head and leaves you feeling lighter, calmer and more in control.

Things to consider

Paring down your wardrobe does mean you get to ask yourself some great questions.

For example, if you could start from scratch with your closet, what would you buy? Or, if you’re stuck in a cycle of ‘consume, donate, consume, donate…’ how much better for your wallet and the environment would it be if you simply stopped? Or, what if I challenged the voice in my head that said, “I could never…..”.

Often, we hear of people trying to fill an emotional vacuum with the temporary high of shopping. But, as Carver writes, “When things are broken but bearable, it feels easier, at first, to stay at ‘bearable’ rather than to address the problems.”

Try lightening your load

Courtney Carver’s quest for more had resulted in stress, depression, debt and strained relationships. It certainly didn’t answer the simplest of questions, “What shall I wear today?” As she writes, “I’d been shopping for years and I still had nothing to wear.”

So, instead of adding more and trying something new, try shopping from your own wardrobe; living a little more intentionally; and lightening your load. Who knows, a little step in this direction could inspire you towards a full-on spring clean or encourage you to get uncluttered once and for all!

Project 333 is published by tarcherperigee, an imprint of Penguin Random House


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Getting ahead with food prep

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Are you a “last-minute-Lucy” or someone who likes to get started with tasks early?

I’ve typically fallen into the latter camp. When issued with an assignment at university (a looongg time ago now!), I’d be the first to head for the library as soon as the question was issued. That approach has stood me in good stead throughout my career, especially when issued with directives from a one-time CEO whose deadline was usually 12:00 noon the following day (no matter how challenging the task).

What I’ve only just realised, though, is how much simpler life becomes if you adopt the same approach to food preparation. Why didn’t I work this out before?! I’ve written about meal planning in the past and I almost always shop to a list (either online or in person), knowing exactly what I’ll cook in the days to come.

However, what I didn’t always do was get ahead with the necessary food prep required to make the actual cooking a lot easier. This would mean I’d arrive home after work then have to start (literally) from scratch. That’s a pretty exhausting prospective if you left at 07:30 and didn’t get home until around 18:30.

Mise en Place

If you’re a trained chef, or experienced foodie, you’ll know how valuable the ‘mise en place’ can be. It certainly makes the production of a specific dish seemingly more effortless. Literally, ‘putting in place’ what you need for a specific recipe may seem like a lot of effort, but it also helps avoid you making mistakes, especially if the dish is unfamiliar.

Watch any TV cook and everything will have been pre-weighed and chopped, leaving them simply to demonstrate how to combine and cook the ingredients in the right order.

Getting ahead

Prepping specific parts of a dish is something I could have been doing before, but never have until now. Imagine needing a cooked sweet potato for fish cakes. In the past, I’d have had to wait for the potato to cook, let it cool a little, then mix in the remaining ingredients. Now, with my newly-discovered cooking super-power, I’m ahead of the game. The potato is baked in the oven the day before, so all I have to do is some deft chopping, a bit of stirring, and we have ready-to-go fish cakes. This helps when family members are wont to say, “What time’s dinner?” at a moment’s notice.

Weekend cooking

At the weekend, there are lots of opportunities to get ahead with food prep. I’m loving Giancarlo and Katie Caldesi’s Diabetes Weight-loss Cook Book, which I mentioned in my last post. Their low-carb lasagne is delicious and I now make my own vegetarian version of it. But, like any lasagne, it requires several stages to prepare. So, yesterday, I made the ‘spinach lasagne’ sheets in advance, cooked the bechamel when I found 20 minutes to spare, and assembled the whole thing during the evening. Today, we’ll have a home-cooked ready meal, with none of the chaos associated with trying to organise the various components all at once (and I’m not a very tidy cook, so this is a good thing!).

Slow cooking

I like the idea of prepping different dishes slowly, over a day or so. Who says you have to slave over a hot-stove, ready to serve a meal as soon as it’s cooked? It certainly takes the stress out of weekday evenings to have food partially prepared. And although you do have to think ahead, taking the slow route to food prep’ is even better if you realise that you’ve run out of something. It’s not unheard of in our house for tasty morsels, destined to go in a particular dish, to be eaten by someone who fancies them as a snack!

So often, we say there isn’t time to cook. But perhaps there is. We just have to fill those spare moments, say while the kettle’s boiling for a cup of tea, with some casual weighing of ingredients or some gentle stirring on the hob. Preparing food in this way also – for me – means that when we do sit down to eat, I enjoy it all the more.

p.s.

Low Carb Lasagne, adapted from The Diabetes Weight-Loss Cookbook

Spinach ‘Pasta’ layers:

Blend together :
370-400g defrosted spinach, squeezed from a 900g bag of frozen spinach
1/2 tsp salt
4 eggs
8 tbsp almond/cow’s milk
1 heaped tbsp psyllium husk powder (get this from Amazon)

Spread across 2 baking sheets that have been lined with oiled baking parchment. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 200 degrees C (fan) for 8-10 minutes.

Allow to cool.

‘Ragu’:

I make a simple veggie version of what could otherwise be a beef ragu.

Combine a large jar of passata with capers, olives, lemon zest, a dash of olive oil and a ti of lentils (I like puy lentils for this).

Use this as your ragu layer.

‘Bechamel’:

550ml almond/cow’s milk
4 tbsp cornflower
4 tbsp double cream
50g butter
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
1 bay leaf

Mix 3 tbsp of the milk with the cornflower in a small bowl. Pour into a saucepan with the remaining ingredients, then put over a medium heat. Whisk to combine, removing from the heat when the sauce has thickened and is bubbling. Season.

If you don’t want to make a bechamel, you could use some ricotta cheese, which I used in the version shown below.

Making up the lasagne:

With 50g parmesan and 125g mozzarella, proceed as follows:

Drop spoonfuls of the bechamel and ragu into a lasagne dish measuring c. 22 x 26 cm. Don’t mix them together. Layer onto this some parmesan and mozzarella, then use some of the spinach lasagne (cut to fit) as your ‘pasta’ layer. Keep going until you have used up all the ingredients.

Bake for 30 minutes at 200 degrees C (fan), then let everything settle for 15 minutes before tucking in.

My version looked like this:

IMG_3299


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Living the Blue Zones way on Blue Monday

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If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ll know I’m a sucker for a new recipem book. And it’s true that probably the only things I regret letting go of in my decluttering phase are some of my lesser-used cookbooks.

Most recently, we’ve been enjoying the wonderful recipes from The Diabetes Weight Loss Cookbook by Katie Caldesi. These low carb, creative and incredibly tasty dishes offer a lighter take on tradional recipes with an italian twist. I’m also keen to have a look at Amelia Freer’s latest book, Simply Good for You but I am holding myself back because of the book I’m about to describe.

The most significant boost to our New Year’s culinary experimentation has to be the amazing The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner.

The Blue Zones concept is amazing; around 15 years ago, Buettner identified the 5 places around the world that have produced the world’s longest-living people. The concept is simple living at its best.

A dip into Blue Zones concept

Here are just 3 interesting aspects of the Blue Zones simple way of life:

Eat a whole food diet

The recipes in The Blue Zones Kitchen are mouth-wateringly good, but simple in their approach. Following the time-honoured recipes of older residents in each location, these dishes are based on just 20 or so basic ingredients and many feature all different types of beans, which – it is recommended – should be eaten every day.

Essentially promoting a plant-based diet, The Blue Zones Kitchen emphasizes whole foods including vegetables, nuts, olive oil (extra-virgin), some grains, lots of greens and fruits with red wine to drink with meals. Out go all kinds of processed foods, plus meat, fish, dairy, eggs and sugar are limited to special occasions or treats.

In our house, we’ve started with a huge pot of home-made Sardinian minestrone soup. That’s going to feel like a hug in a mug when it gets to lunch time today!

Exercise naturally

For exercise, ‘blue-zoners’ enjoy natural movement, especially walking and gardening, to keep them active and healthly throughout their whole lives. What’s refreshing is is that Blue Zones inhabitants simply walk wherever they have to go.

Consider walking up and down the mountains of Sardinia or Ikaria and you’ll realise that will get the heart pumping! That sounds so much more appealing than sitting at a desk all whole day long, then driving to the gym to attempt to offset the lack of activity earlier in the day.

At work, a small number of us who all live relatively near to one another are discussing the idea of setting up a walking group so that we can walk together to/from the office. By doing this, we’d reap the benefits of a simple daily workout whilst also building our social network. I can walk home from work in about 1 hour, 15 minutes, so as the daylight hours extend as we head towards spring, I’m looking forward to doing more of this.

Be sociable without social media

One of the positive aspects of those leading a ‘Blue Zones life’ is what Buettner describes as, “..active engagement with community, friends and family.” Spending quality time with other people increases people’s sense of wellbeing and I’ll be there’s not an iPhone in sight.

Last week, in the news, we learned that UK psychiatrists have said that tech companies must share their data with researchers to help improve understanding of the affects of social media on children. For all of us, having our heads stuck in our phones – even for reading – means that we’re failing to engage with others; make connections; or appreciate what’s going on around us.

This weekend, I intentionally spent less time on my phone and more time in the presence of others. It felt like I’d had several days away from the office, instead of just two. Maybe I should switch it off altogether at the weekends…. that would be an interesting experiment.

Don’t be blue

Today is said to be ‘Blue Monday’, a day that is said to be the most depressing in the year.

So, I say let’s not be blue. Let’s learn a little from the Blue Zones way of life and inject a little simplicity, health and happiness into our lives.


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Going barefoot in 2020

Happy New Year 2020! I hope that this new decade will bring you love, peace and joy. In fact, my word of the year is going to be ‘joy’. What’s yours?

Going barefoot

One of the things that will no doubt bring me joy in 2020 is doing more walking. This requires strength, stamina and flexibility both mentally and physically (and from head to toe). I’ve written before about my ambition to walk the South West Coast Path, which we started back in November. Now, I’ll be stepping up the pace, as we will tackle more of The Path in 2020.

For the longest time, I have mostly been wearing what my Grandma would probably have branded ‘sensible shoes’. As I possess long toes that are crushed inside pointy shoes, I decided some time ago that continuing to wear ill-fitting shoes (and/or shoes with heels) would not be good for my long-term wellbeing.

Plus, I use a standing desk at work, so towering over the keyboard when wearing heels negates the benefits of having the desk at all, as this has a negative effect on posture.

Ecco has been my go-to brand of choice in recent years, but last year I came across minimalist barefoot shoes.

A ‘barefoot shoe’ is an oxymoron

The concept of a barefoot shoe is an oxymoron. You’re not literally going without shoes, but the idea of a barefoot shoe is that you have room for the toes to splay naturally and the foot is able to work in the way God designed! My daughter, seeing the picture of my foot alongside the barefoot shoe was horrified: “Mum!!! You cannot put your FEET! On Instagram!!! Your feet!!!!” But I’ve done it again by posting a picture here. If you don’t like feet, feel free to look away….

I’ve tried the Primus Knit and the Ra Slip On

My first pair (pictured) were the Vivobarefoot Primus Knit in Olive. I have found them to be well-made and exactly as described. They are thin-soled, wide and shallow (note that, if you have a high instep, this shape might not suit you). I feel as though they give my feet a little massage when I wear them and, whilst you can feel the ground beneath your feet, this is not uncomfortable. However, these are not waterproof shoes. Given all the rain we’ve had, I’ve not been able to wear them outside on a wet day. This style is better off kept indoors and for the dry weather.

The Ra Slip On has solved my problem of what to wear in the office. The majority of the Barefoot shoes sold by Vivobarefoot are more ‘sporty spice’ than ‘posh spice.’ The Ra Slip On goes with anything and works just as well with a dress and tights as it does with jeans and a jumper. So far so good!

When the brand re-stocks its boots next autumn, I’m going to be first in line.

Joining the barefoot revolution

Tim Brennan, founder of Vivobarefoot, has now set up a community of barefoot enthusiasts. The idea is to bring barefoot shoes to the masses and revolutionalise health across the world. And why not!? Check out Tim on Instagram where you can see pictures of his inital proof-of-concept shoe and find out how to get involved.

So, what will bring you joy in 2020? Maybe going barefoot can be a part of it?


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Avoiding the consumer trap: How minimalism can help in the holiday season

As soon as Hallowe’en and Bonfire Night are over, then – boom!– we seem to be launched into the holiday season. I always feel a little dismayed to see Christmas decorations in the shops even as early as late October/early November, with advertisers trying to persuade us that ‘Winter is here!’

[Dear marketers: Winter is not here. Here, you will find we are in the throes of a wet but nonetheless beautiful Autumn.]

Inevitably, though, our thoughts will turn to gifting and the inevitable questions:

  • What are we doing for Christmas? (swap out whichever holiday festival applies to you)
  • What would like for Christmas?

I’ve written about this before, but it’s no bad thing to reflect on what we can do to enjoy the festivities; to offer our loved-ones or colleagues a token of our love and gratitude; and to get through the holiday season with our bank balance intact.

Experiences over stuff

Experiences (as opposed to stuff) are what stay with us long after the occasion itself. This is where a minimalist’s approach can help avoid overwhelm, clutter, the purchase of unnecessary ‘stuff’ and overspending.

I recently celebrated A Signficant Birthday (yes, I am 20-lots!) and very much appreciated the lovely gifts I received. They were real treats, many of them consumable and (for the vast majority), they were about experiences over stuff. An afternoon tea with friends, dining ‘haute cuisine’ and spa experiences are the types of things we can share and enjoy together to create memories. These are the gifts that I will recall when I look back on my 50th birthday.

Enablers

One category, which may be worth considering as part of your 2019 gifting strategy is that of ‘enablers’. Perhaps piece of equipment or clothing to enable someone to enjoy a particular experience would be a great gift. When Mr G turned 50, we created a Fun Fund, which has supported a number of short trips, as well as the purchase of some necessary equipment (e.g. hiking boots).

For this Christmas, My dad has asked for something useful that, for him, falls into the category of ‘enabler’. Recently, he bought himself a new CAD/CAM package, with the associated e-book manual. However, he’d really like to be able to thumb through a physical book, which will help him get to grips with the new software that he uses for his model engineering drawings. That’s what we’ll buy for him.

Another example is membership of an association or organisation that could support and enable future adventures. We’ve just joined the South West Coast Path Association, which helps support the 630 miles of coastal path along which we hope to hike over the next few months and years. The photo for this post shows the first section of the Path, between Minehead in Somerset and Porlock, just a little way down the coast (and taken last weekend).

Consumables

Don’t forget, things you make yourself can be inexpensive, but very much appreciated.

Last year, my lovely sister-in-law got me into making fudge… in the slow cooker. This sounds very odd indeed, but it’s incredibly easy to do and the results are very delicious indeed. Imagine lemon meringue fudge, with a melt-in-the-mouth texture….you get the idea. There are groups online where you can get discover the basic method, get inspiration for different recipes and seek the advice of more experience fudge-makers if you’re not sure how it’s going (the group I joined is on Facebook). My mantra over fudge making? Follow the instructions to the letter and you can’t go wrong.

Do good, feel good

Finally, before you rush out and buy Christmas cards, consider instead a donation to a charity that will make a difference to people’s lives this holiday season. I’ve recently become aware of The Hygiene Bank. Their #ITSINTHEBAG is truly inspiring and that’s something I’m going to be looking into over the next few days.

Whatever we do – and however we celebrate – being intentional about how we spend our money and to whom (and to what) we give our attention means more than anything money can buy.

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How would you define minimalism?

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A college student doing an ethnography project dropped me a line this week with some great questions. I enjoyed answering them, so thought you might be interested to see our Q&A. Here it is!

How would you define minimalism?

I define minimalism as the intentional removal of anything that no longer adds value to your life. It’s the modern day version of William Morris’ assertion, “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.”

How long have you considered yourself a minimalist?

I’ve considered myself to be a minimalist since 2016, when I really started to unclutter my life in earnest (not only removing stuff, but also reducing obligations and commitments).

Why do you think minimalism has been picking up so much steam in the last decade?

Well, they say it takes 10 years to become an overnight success. Prominent people in the minimalism movement, such as Joshua Becker, have been champions of simple living for many years. What may have given it more prominence is the advent of social media and podcasts, which have enabled the message to reach a wider audience. Joshua’s Uncluttered course, for example, has seen over 30,000 people take part.

Others including Gretchen Rubin, who writes about happiness, habit and human behaviour, have also legitimised decluttering, making it more mainstream by showing how it can impact positively on people’s lives. There’s also some crossover into other areas of wellbeing such as personal finance, where we have seen the boys from The Minimalists join Dave Ramsey for a segment on his popular podcast. David Sawyer, in his book Reset, also talks about the significant benefits of decluttering.

What are some advantages of living a minimalist lifestyle?

Oh, so many! One’s home is easier to maintain and keep clean; you’ll save money by not buying stuff you don’t need; you can improve your wellbeing by getting out into nature rather than spending your leisure time shopping  and you no longer feel weighted down by stuff you don’t need.

Would you say TV shows like tiny house living/hunters and popular minimalists like Marie Kondo have attracted more people to this lifestyle?

I haven’t seen the TV shows you mention, but I think that Marie Kondo’s quirky ‘spark joy’ mantra is memorable, fun and appealing. Her approach, along with that of The Minimalists, Courtney Carver, Joshua Becker and others, has definitely brought minimalism to the masses.

What are some of the most popular misconceptions about minimalism?
Minimalism isn’t necessarily about living in bare, white spaces. Equally, it’s not about living with ‘X’ number of items or being able to pack all of your stuff into a single holdall. At least, that’s true for most of us.

Living with less – or ‘right-sizing’ your belongings is more the way people I know enjoy minimalism; I call it ‘moderate minimalism’ (especially when you have a family and it’s neither fair nor proper to declutter other people’s stuff).

Why do you think the US has the highest standard of living yet people living here are still unhappy?

Governments – and public policy in general – have been slow to recognise the importance of wellbeing in people’s lives of which I believe minimalism plays a part.

You’ll be familiar with Robert Kennedy’s 1968 speech in which he addressed an election rally, commenting Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measure of success: “Too much and for too long, we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things.”

I’m certainly not an expert on US culture, but a high standard of living has to be paid for and I’m aware through listening to American podcasts that there’s also a high prevalence of debt in society. That’s a negative when it comes to people’s subjective sense of life satisfaction and happiness.

Do you think Tiny Homes/minimalism in general is a solution to a problem America hasn’t figured out yet?

The Tiny House movement is so interesting, partly because it’s the polar opposite to the growth in the average size of homes seen over the last 4 decades. Tiny Houses may form part of the solution when it comes to providing more affordable housing. They may also help providing social housing, such as the Social Bite Village project in Scotland whose aim is to provide homes to residents who are currently living in temporary accommodation for long periods of time.

Minimalism can support this (and other societal objectives). By seeking to live with less, we naturally consume less (good for the environment), potentially enabling us to live happier, healthier and wealthier lives.

People are starting to rethink what it means to be happy and successful in life, it used to be having a big house and cars and a high paying job even if it wasn’t one you loved…So, how do you think the minimalist movement has changed or altered the idea of what it means to be successful?

Many modern-day movements, such as the FIRE movement, are redefining what success looks like. In some ways, minimalism has brought us back to what our grandparents knew: living simpler, valuing people over stuff, not worrying about what others thinking of us and being grateful for what we have. That said, I’m not sure the same message has reached the youth of today. It worries me that some of the idealised images promulgated on social media are influencing our teenagers and young adults in a negative way. The fast fashion, make-up and styling trends to which they aspire are costing more than just the pounds and pence they spend to keep up.

Do you think minimalism is a radical lifestyle?

Minimalism could be radical; it’s certainly a countercultural lifestyle. But I suggest it’s for everyone. Being more intentional about what we own and what we buy can bring positive benefits for anyone. It’s also a more sustainable way to live.

How can minimalism positively impact families?

Minimalism helps families in so many ways. Family life is simpler when everything has its place; it’s easier to locate the things you need; you have more space in your home and you may even experience what Gretchen Rubin calls ‘outer order, inner calm’. This is particularly true for kids with special needs for whom an uncluttered environment can be especially beneficial.

Discover more

If you’re curious about how living with less can make a difference to your life, the autumn session of the popular Uncluttered course ends this weekend, so don’t miss out! The course begins on Tuesday, so click here to find out more.


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