What lockdown has taught me about simplicity

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When I first embalked upon my simplicity journey around 4 years ago, I described how this wasn’t only about being able to let of excess ‘stuff.’ Back then, becoming minimalist was also about letting go of a sense of obligation, of constant busy-ness, and stress.

Our time in lockdown has taken me back to that time of living more simply and letting go. We’re now on Day 75 here in the UK. As lockdown restrictions begin to ease (for good or ill – no pun intended), I feel it’s worth reflecting on what this time has taught me so far.

Lockdown lessons

First of all, let me say if you’re a key worker or frontline care giver/medic/clinician, then I cannot begin to imagine what this time has meant for you. No doubt, you’re still in the thick of it. One of my neighbours (a consultant obstetrician gynecologist) told us a bit about the PPE he had to wear to perform his role; that in itself was remarkable).

Likewise, if you have lost someone to Covid-19, then I’m truly sorry for your loss. This post isn’t going to be for you. So, feel free to click on by.

Rather, this post is for those of us who’ve simply being told to sit on the sofa and stay put. It’s for those of us who are – and continue to be – keyboard warriors. It’s for those of us who have been at home, some of us with family members or even with a cobbled-together ‘Covid family,’ as friends (or even colleagues) have gone into lockdown together to wait for the storm to pass. It’s for those of us who’ve had the privilege of being able to work from home while spring has unfurled its fresh, green leaves and birdsong was all we could hear when traffic levels dropped to levels not seen since 1955.

Letting go

Now we’ve go that over with, here’s what I think.

Let’s not ‘go back to normal’. Let’s move forward towards a new way of being that sits more comfortably with who we want to become. But how do we do this?

Here’s where I return to letting go any sense of obligation. Let go of the things that don’t serve you or bring you joy. It’s your life, so when the world around you starts to pick up speed again, remember that you get to choose what stays and what goes.

I’m not trying to suggest that you’re not bound by work objectives or by responsibilites that sit rightfully with you as a colleague, partner, parent or good pal. Whatever we do, we should still desire to do the right thing. But if spending time at home has caused you to reflect a little and to take stock, consider these questions:

  • Who do I want to spend my time with?
  • What’s really important to me?
  • What really matters?
  • What am I passionate about?
  • What do I love doing and which makes me feel alive?
  • What would I do, if I knew I couldn’t fail?

What (or who) will you allow to ebb away?

I spent a couple of hours last week with a friend (2m apart, as per government guidelines, sitting in the sunshine alongside the riverbank close to her home). She described the relief she had felt at not having to see people she didn’t want to see, or go to places that she preferred to avoid.

In an interview with Reece Witherspoon, writer and activist Glennon Doyle says that the lives we lead ‘must be the truest, most beautiful lives we can imagine. Don’t settle!’ So, what would your truest, most beautiful life look like, if you could re-craft it from the start? The questions, above, might just help you consider this.

The ‘To Do’ List

One of the things I seem to have let go of naturally is my personal ‘to do’ list. My work action plan is typically well-structured, but I’d previously brought some of that hyper-organisation into life at home. What I’ve been able to do in lockdown is go with the flow. Weather’s good? Go and potter in the garden! Feel like sorting out a few papers? Do that.

Somehow, letting go of the never-ending task list is a release. Jobs still get done. And it doesn’t actually matter if they don’t….

On occasion, this has also meant letting go of things that I have always righteously claimed as my own, such as meal preparation. Knowing that there is plenty of food in the house to produce simple, nutritious dishes has enabled me to let go of being Head Chef.  Making a meal need not always be my job. On Sunday, after 5 hours in the garden, I came back into the house to find our 18-year-old had found a recipe via BBC Good Food, assembled all the ingredients (adding a few that she fancied) and hey presto! we had lunch.

The ‘do‘ List

Being in lockdown has given me some new-found (or rediscovered) joys; little moments that you can enjoy in your day. Check them out:

  • Nichola Joss’ facial massage on Instagram (weekday evening at 20:00 BST) and mornings, too
  • Online book clubs (authors going live include the fabulous Marian Keyes on Facebook (Mondays, 17:00 BST  next one 15 June)
  • Online yoga – I attend my own teacher’s online class (Living Your Yoga) but check out others including DoYogaWithMe.com

So, do what you want to do. Live life on your own terms. And let go of anything that doesn’t allow you to be your best self. And don’t forget the lessons that lockdown taught us.


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Email me via catherineelizgordon@gmail.com, or connect with me on Instagram